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Lil b youtube

Equally inspired by Prince and 2Pac, Lil B Brandon McCartney is an eccentric, ambitious rapper who utilized social media to its fullest and became an Internet age celebrity, cultivating a fiercely loyal following and inspiring a generation of rappers and hipsters without ever signing to a major label. Lil B is known for his optimistic outlook, which he refers to as his "Based" philosophy, and preaches positivity and tolerance through his music. He also uses the term "Based" to signify his brand of freestyle rapping, and while much of his vast body of work sounds off-the-cuff, his more considered efforts take on serious subjects, particularly related to society and the age of information. While the majority of his output is overwhelmingly positive and encouraging, his dark side has emerged through releases like Thugged Out Pissed Off, as well as his occasional feuds with fellow rappers or basketball players. He has branched far outside the realm of hip-hop with the release of spoken word and new age material, and has dabbled with indie rock, claiming an affinity for the genre. Likewise, he has become a favorite of indie rock and experimental music types, and has received much coverage from Pitchfork and The Wire. Lil B came up with the Bay Area's the Pack, a group affiliated with the hyphy scene that had a hit with the sneaker-loving track "Vans. New solo songs would regularly get posted to his MySpace site and then, in late , he began to toy with the excessiveness of the Internet, storming the Web in a full-on blitzkrieg. As the prolific and unfiltered Lil Wayne was to the mixtape game, so was Lil B to the Net, creating no less than MySpace pages, each linked to create one giant body of work. Originally, aliases such as the BasedLord and BasedGod appeared alongside streaming audio of Lil B freestyling over familiar beats.
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How does one explain God? How does one explain faith? Who is Lil B? Where did he come from? What kind of grades did he get in school? We can answer two of those questions. Anyways, shortly after The Pack rose to momentary national prominence, Lil B took to MySpace, creating page after page and releasing track after track, getting weirder and more unhinged by the day, assuming the lyrical guise of nerds, college bros, the captain of a starship a personal favorite , and rapping about pretty much everything. What you had was a young, creative rapper hermetically sealing himself in the Internet, and emerging a nearly completely-unrecognizable entity with his own world, slang, and philosophy. As of this writing, Lil B easily has over 75 mixtapes, as well as two semi-legit several hundred-song compilations, one of his collected MySpace works clocked in at nearly tracks, and one of of his Based Freestyles. This is the Internet, however, so the a compilation was assembled by Noz on Cocaine Blunts of some of the really good ones.
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The hyper-prolific rapper with an endless number of YouTube freestyles finds a new focus and crafts his most accessible album. It's possible not even Lil B knows how much music he's released in the past four years. Spend 15 minutes trying to sort out how much he's made in the past four months and you'll feel in your stomach just how deep the Internet goes. More than any other musician, the Bay Area rapper has adapted his creative behavior to resemble the rippling action of your RSS feed-- an unceasing, pellet-dispenser flow of new content. It's a self-contained musical universe, located at the vanishing point on the "all-or-nothing" spectrum, and its cult of faithful has been steadily building to the point where the mainstream rap industry has been forced to contend with him. The result was a hip-hop comedy of manners: as XXL included him on their Freshmen list alongside industry non-entities like Mac Miller and Lil Twist and Lupe Fiasco publicly congratulated himself for "getting it," B basically continued whistling his tune, collaborating with Lil Wayne and Jean Grae and Tony Yayo and rapping over How to Dress Well instrumentals. And then he announced at Coachella he was going to name his next album I'm Gay. With this single statement, Lil B calmly detonated a flower-power land mine in the center of what is arguably rap's most tortured, combustible political arena. Whatever his motivations it probably had something to do with his philosophy of universal acceptance and self-love, but his manifestos don't survive close analysis , he guaranteed that the album's audience would be exponentially larger than anything he'd done before. I'm Gay appeared on iTunes last week, and by convenience or design, it's his most coherent, cohesive, and accessible single release to date.

The hyper-prolific rapper with an endless number of YouTube freestyles finds a new focus and crafts his most accessible album. It's possible not even Lil B knows how much music he's released in the past four years. Spend 15 minutes trying to sort out how much he's made in the past four months and you'll feel in your stomach just how deep the Internet goes. More than any other musician, the Bay Area rapper has adapted his creative behavior to resemble the rippling action of your RSS feed-- an unceasing, pellet-dispenser flow of new content. It's a self-contained musical universe, located at the vanishing point on the "all-or-nothing" spectrum, and its cult of faithful has been steadily building to the point where the mainstream rap industry has been forced to contend with him.

The result was a hip-hop comedy of manners: as XXL included him on their Freshmen list alongside industry non-entities like Mac Miller and Lil Twist and Lupe Fiasco publicly congratulated himself for "getting it," B basically continued whistling his tune, collaborating with Lil Wayne and Jean Grae and Tony Yayo and rapping over How to Dress Well instrumentals. And then he announced at Coachella he was going to name his next album I'm Gay. With this single statement, Lil B calmly detonated a flower-power land mine in the center of what is arguably rap's most tortured, combustible political arena.

Whatever his motivations it probably had something to do with his philosophy of universal acceptance and self-love, but his manifestos don't survive close analysis , he guaranteed that the album's audience would be exponentially larger than anything he'd done before. I'm Gay appeared on iTunes last week, and by convenience or design, it's his most coherent, cohesive, and accessible single release to date.

His followers may debate whether Rain in England or 6 Kiss or Illusions of Grandeur or Bitch Mob: Respect Da Bitch is better Lil B has a flair for titles , but for the uninitiated, I'm Gay does a great job of articulating his ethos and appeal in the space of one album. That's not to say that I'm Gay contains all of Lil B's personae.

The album finds him securely in his dazed, child-like observer mode, where he peers at the world as if for the first time and wonders aloud.

He has many other faces-- occasional boom-bap traditionalist , tweaker of boom-bap traditionalism , uncomfortably personal YouTube diarist -- but this side is easily B's most relatable and endearing. You're unlikely to find a more guileless or gentle hip-hop record this year. Lil B's stream-of-consciousness lyrical approach remains uniquely suited to this sort of cosmic contemplation.

Composing your thoughts on the fly has obvious downsides, and Lil B's YouTube channel is littered with examples of times he hit "record" and the muse failed to follow.

But here, he's consistently focused and has a knack for articulating universal sentiments in seemingly artless wording: I can't think of anyone else who could say things like, "The people die for a piece of paper, it's so stupid" or "If God's real, then why'd my friend have to die? But then, reproducing lines like these in print doesn't do them justice. Lil B's music draws on spontaneity as its wellspring; you hear him stumble, pause for breath, abandon a line of thought and start over.

He projects fearlessness, which can take many forms: it can mean deciding to name your rap album "I'm Gay" out of thin air. The subtitled "I'm Happy" was a deflating backward step, it's true, but it was hard to get riled considering how little motivation he had to choose the name I ' m Gay in the first place. It can also mean posting the album for free to your quarter-million Twitter followers hours after it was made available for purchase.

It can mean sharing every half-baked scrap and warty throwaway you record, trusting your fans to decide what's worth keeping. So while I'm Gay isn't a definitive statement, it is an especially compelling point on a bizarre trajectory, one that feels worth keeping around. Skip to content Search query All Results. Pitchfork is the most trusted voice in music. Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Open share drawer.



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